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Learn effective methods to eliminate the flashing not allowed sign on Linux and optimize your system's performance.


Title: How to Get Rid of a Flashing Not Allowed Sign on Linux:

Having a flashing "Not Allowed" sign on your Linux system can be frustrating. However, with a few troubleshooting steps, you can resolve this issue and get your system back to normal. In this guide, we will walk you through the process in a friendly tone, helping you troubleshoot the problem effectively.


I. Check Input Devices and Keyboard Keys

When faced with a flashing "Not Allowed" sign on your Linux system, the first step is to check your input devices and keyboard keys. Sometimes, a stuck or malfunctioning key can cause this issue.


1. Begin by unplugging your keyboard, mouse, and any other input devices connected to your system.

2. Inspect these devices for any visible damage or obstruction. Clean them if necessary.

3. Replace the input devices with known working ones or borrow from a friend temporarily.

4. Test your system to see if the flashing sign persists. If it does, proceed to the next step.


II. Troubleshoot Potential 5.x Kernel Bugs

If replacing the input devices didn't solve the issue, it's time to look into potential bugs in the 5.x kernel.


1. Open a terminal and enter the following command: `sudo apt-get install evtest`.

2. Once the installation is complete, run the `evtest` command to disable keyboard keys temporarily. This will help determine if the issue is caused by a specific key.

3. Follow the on-screen instructions and press the problematic key when prompted.

4. If the flashing sign disappears, it indicates that the issue is related to that specific key. You can either remap the key or reset your keyboard settings to default.


III. Remap Key or Reset Keyboard

If disabling the keyboard keys didn't work, you can try remapping the problematic key(s) or resetting your keyboard settings to default.


1. To remap a key, you will need to edit the keyboard configuration file. Open a terminal and enter the following command: `sudo nano /etc/default/keyboard`.

2. In the editor, locate the line that starts with `XKBOPTIONS=` and add the following command: `terminate:ctrl_alt_bksp`. This command will remap the problematic key to the Ctrl + Alt + Backspace combination.

3. Save the file and exit the editor.

4. Alternatively, you can reset your keyboard settings to default. Open a terminal and enter the following command: `sudo dpkg-reconfigure keyboard-configuration`. Follow the on-screen instructions to reset the keyboard settings.

5. Once you have remapped the key or reset the keyboard settings, restart your system and check if the flashing sign is gone.


IV. Block intel_vbtn Driver

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If none of the previous steps resolved the issue, it may be necessary to block the intel_vbtn driver.


1. Open a terminal and enter the following command: `sudo nano /etc/modprobe.d/blacklist.conf`.

2. In the editor, add the following line at the end of the file: `blacklist intel_vbtn`.

3. Save the file and exit the editor.

4. Reboot your computer for the changes to take effect.

5. After the reboot, check if the flashing sign has disappeared. If not, proceed to the next step.


V. Change Linux Version and Select Advanced Options (if necessary)

If all previous steps failed to resolve the issue, you may consider changing your Linux version or selecting advanced options during the installation/setup process.


1. Research and identify a different version of Linux that is compatible with your system. You can find various distributions and versions available for free online.

2. Download the ISO file for the chosen version and create a bootable USB or DVD.

3. Boot your system from the USB or DVD, following the installation instructions for the new Linux version.

4. During the installation/setup process, look for advanced options that allow you to customize the installation or modify system settings.

5. Choose the options that are relevant to your issue and proceed with the installation.

6. After the installation is complete, test your system to see if the flashing sign is no longer present.



By following these steps in a friendly tone, you should be able to troubleshoot and resolve the flashing "Not Allowed" sign issue on your Linux system. Remember to proceed from one step to another only if the previous ones didn't solve the problem. We hope this guide helps you get back to using your Linux system without any interruptions!

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